If you are charged with any type of crime, from DUI to domestic violence, it’s critical to understand the finer details of your charges and how you fit into the legal system.

While you are not required by the law to hire an attorney if you’re charged with a crime, there are many reasons to consider doing so.

  • Targeted experience: Don’t assume there is nothing an attorney can do to help prevent a conviction. Even if the evidence against you is strong, an attorney with targeted experience can create a defense strategy to help prevent a conviction or at the very least lessen the punishment.
  • Knowledge of applicable laws: You may think you understand the law as it pertains to your crime, but it’s not likely that you have the same level of knowledge as an attorney. Understanding the law is one of the most important aspects of avoiding a conviction.
  • Someone to answer your questions: You can expect to have a variety of questions shortly after you’re charged and as your court date approaches. Your attorney can answer your questions, provide feedback and help put some of your concerns to rest.
  • To remove some of the burden: The stress associated with criminal charges is enough to bog anyone down. While you’ll have this hanging over your head until your case is resolved, consulting with an attorney will provide some relief. You can rely on this person to handle the legal aspects of your case, thus ensuring that you don’t have to.
  • To explain your options: For example, you may assume that your case has to head to court, but your attorney may have another idea in mind. An attorney won’t force you to do something you don’t agree with, but they can explain your options and the pros and cons associated with them.

These are just a few of the many reasons to consult with an attorney if you’re charged with a crime. With the right legal team guiding you, you’ll be more confident in your ability to handle all aspects of your case. And even better, you can rely on this person to position you for success, which typically means avoiding a conviction and the associated consequences.