A criminal conviction in Plano can bring with it a number of lingering consequences. One might assume those to be in relation to whatever social stigma may come depending on the nature of the crime in question. Yet there are also measurable impacts that a criminal conviction can have on a person’s civil rights.

One of these is the basic right to own and possess a firearm. Nearly every state imposes certain restrictions on gun rights in conjunction with a criminal conviction. Fortunately, most also offer a pathway back to having those rights restored.

Gun rights restrictions in Texas

In terms of the limits placed on those convicted of a crime (specifically in regards to their gun ownership rights), Texas is no exception. Indeed, according to the U.S. Probation Office, the Gun Control Act of 1968 prohibits people convicted of a felony of receiving, transporting, owning or possessing any of the following:

  • Firearms
  • Ammunition
  • Explosive materials

Local rights restoration laws

However, as mentioned earlier, the state does allow one to regain their gun ownership rights following a criminal conviction (even if the crime was a felony). Information shared by the Restoration of Rights Project shows that before one can seek to have their rights restored, five years must pass from the date the completed their criminal sentence (whether that sentence include incarceration, probation or community supervision). At that point, they can apply to own and possess a firearm again. Yet there is one stipulation they must abide by: they can only legally possess the firearm in their home.

If one has the case against them dismissed or discharged, local gun ownership restrictions would not apply to them.